Man coughs up blood clot shaped like a bronchial tree

Man coughs up blood clot shaped like a bronchial tree

Man coughs up blood clot shaped like a bronchial tree

A 36-year-old California man has passed away after suffering from chronic heart failure and coughing so severely that he coughed up a part of his lung.

It turns out that the 36-year-old patient's condition produced elevated levels of fibrinogen, a protein that can act as a glue to assist the clotting process, which allowed the rubbery "blood sculpture" to escape the man's trachea intact.

The mysterious, cherry-red cast resembles a piece of coral and an image of it has gone viral after appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The unnamed patient was being treated at the intensive care unit at the University of California San Francisco Medical Centre, which was where reports say he started coughing violently. And, during a rather extreme hack, he coughed up "an intact cast of the right bronchial tree".

"We were astonished", Wieselthaler told The Atlantic.

"An Impella ventricular assist device was placed for management of acute heart failure, and a continuous heparin infusion was initiated for systemic anticoagulation".

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After days of coughing up tiny blood clots, the man eventually - much to his relief - spat up a cast of his right lung's bronchial tree.

After coughing up part of his lung, the patient was immediately intubated and doctors performed a bronchoscopy, which is a test that allows them to examine airways.

However, anticoagulants can cause problems if a breach occurs in the blood-vessel network, which happened in this extraordinary case; blood broke out of the patient's pulmonary network into his lower right lung. "It's a curiosity you can't imagine-I mean, this is very, very, very rare", he said in a The Atlantic report.

However, doctors said the patient died a week later from heart failure complications.

In 2005, a heavily pregnant woman coughed up a similar but smaller bronchial tree clot.

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