Trump Says China is Targeting U.S. Farmers, Being 'Vicious'

Trump Says China is Targeting U.S. Farmers, Being 'Vicious'

Trump Says China is Targeting U.S. Farmers, Being 'Vicious'

Trump is also set to meet Wednesday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

The red, white and blue banners for U.S. President Donald Trump's second-term campaign are ready to ship, emblazoned with the words "Keep America Great!"

On Wednesday morning, President Trump tweeted that China is "vicious" on trade and said it's targeting US farmers specifically because "they know I love & respect" them. WaPo reports that Trump wants GPO leaders to "trust his business acumen". In another tweet, Trump claimed that "Negotiations are going really well, be cool". The end result will be worth it!'

But that provided little solace to rank-and-file Republicans, who said the tariffs are simply taxes and warned the action would open a Pandora's box for other sectors of the economy.

Some Republicans in farm states are dismissing the Trump administration's plan to provide $12 billion in emergency relief in the wake of trade disputes between the US and other countries, particularly China.

Trade damage from such retaliation has impacted a host of U.S. commodities, including field crops like soybeans and sorghum, livestock products like milk and pork, and many fruits, nuts and other specialty crops, it said.

The food purchased from farmers would include some types of fruits, nuts, rice, legumes, dairy products, beef and pork, officials said.

Details of the plan were not clear.The administration's proposal will rely on commodity support programs as well as the Agriculture Department's authority to stabilize farmers during times of turmoil, according to Politico.

(See Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue sporting one here.) The message is a calculated one as the White House seeks to ease farmers' concerns that a USA trade war will hit them hard.

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Additionally, American goods shipped overseas are being slowed from reaching market by unusually strict or cumbersome entry procedures, which can affect the quality and marketability of perishable crops, it said.

While wheat harvest is underway, Karmen said corn and soybeans won't be harvested until later in the fall. The industry has taken a major hit following Trump's move to slap tariffs on imports from some of America's largest foreign buyers, including Canada, China, and Mexico.

Trump has said current trade policy disadvantages US farmers and manufacturers, and supporters say USA tariffs slapped on billions of dollars of imports are a necessary step to negotiate better deals.

American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall welcomed the aid, saying it "should help many of our farmers and ranchers weather the rough road ahead and assist in their dealings with their financial institutions".

Its announcement would also serve as an indication that Trump has no plans to lift his tariffs any time soon, as senators from across the Farm Belt have pleaded with him to do.

South Dakota Republican Sen.

"I firmly believe we need to either create more markets or be able to work it out with China because we are going to produce way too many soybeans for the markets that we have", he said.

Zippy Duvall, president of the American Farm Bureau Federation, said the $12 billion package provides a welcome measure of temporary relief, but added they can not overstate the dire consequences that farmers and ranchers are facing with lost export markets.

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